The Exchange: The BHC Weblog

Virtual AHA Seminar: Business History TodayApril 13th, 20212 pm Colloquium--An assessment of the doing of business history at the beginning of the 21st century, sketching new trends and themes.Chair: Philip B. Scranton, Rutgers University-CamdenPresenters:Business History, Theory, and Globalizationby Kenneth J. Lipartito, Florida International UniversityRethinking Chinese Economic Life and

The Spanish Association of International Economics and Finance (AEEFI) and the University of Murcia are pleased to announce that the 22nd Conference on International Economics will take place in Murcia on June 17th and 18th, 2021.

The keynote speakers are:

Paul De Grauwe  (The London School of Economics and Political Science)

Gabriel Pérez-Quirós  (European Central Bank)

The conference will have a hybrid format with online sessions and in-person sessions (which will be also accessed remotely through the Zoom platform for those prevented from traveling by COVID-19 or any other cause).

All authors who participate in the conference will have the opportunity to submit the papers presented to be considered for publication in the Special Issue of the journal Economics-The Open Access Open-Assessment E-Journal. 

Topics: International Trade, International Capital Movements, International Finance, Open Economy Macroeconomics, Migration Flows, International Flows of Services, Trade and Firm Behaviour, Trade Policies and Economic Integration, Labour Market and Trade and Financial Flows.

The extended deadline for manuscript submission is April 15, 2021.

More information: https://aeefi.com/en/cie/ 

We would appreciate it if you could distribute this announcement within your institution and to everyone you consider that could be interested.

We look forward to receiving your research papers and we hope to see you in Murcia.

Kind regards,

AEEFI Board of Directors

The Spanish Association of International Economics and Finance (AEEFI) and the University of Murcia are pleased to announce that the 22nd Conference on International Economics will take place in Murcia on June 17th and 18th, 2021.The keynote speakers are:Paul De Grauwe  (The London School of Economics and Political Science)Gabriel Pérez-Quirós  (European Central Bank)The conference will have a

2nd International Conference on Indian Business & Economic History

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

August 24 (Tue), Aug 25 (Wed), Aug 26 (Thu), Aug 27 (Fri), 2021

The 2nd International Conference on Indian Business & Economic History will be hosted online, anchored by IIMA, on August 24-27, 2021. It will be a forum to host research papers, provide a workshop for Ph.D. students, and spark conversations on this subject. The conference will draw in leading scholars working in the field within and outside India.

Conference Organizing Committee

Chinmay Tumbe (IIM-Ahmedabad, India)

Tirthankar Roy (London School of Economics & Political Science)

Medha Kudaisya (National University of Singapore)

Bishnupriya Gupta (Warwick University)

Chikayoshi Nomura (Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo)

Conference Timeline

Submission Deadline: April 30, 2021

Notification to selected students and speakers by May 10, 2021

Conference Dates: August 24 (PhD Student Workshop), August 25, 26, 27 (Research Papers and other sessions), 2021

Conference ModeOnline. Registration to the conference is free and participants can log-on to the proceedings from anywhere in the world.

2nd International Conference on Indian Business & Economic HistoryIndian Institute of Management AhmedabadAugust 24 (Tue), Aug 25 (Wed), Aug 26 (Thu), Aug 27 (Fri), 2021The 2nd International Conference on Indian Business & Economic History will be hosted online, anchored by IIMA, on August 24-27, 2021. It will be a forum to host research papers, provide a workshop for Ph.D. students, and spark


Cornell University History of Capitalism Summer Camp

The application deadline is May 1, 2021. The form to submit your application is available here.


AVON: AN INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON ITS ARCHIVE

In the 20 years since Avon Products, Inc., deposited its records at Hagley Library they have become one of our most popular research collections. A virtual event on May 7 will bring attention to their contribution to history.

Avon Products, Inc., is one of the oldest direct selling companies in America. It traces its origins to 1886, when David H. McConnell bought the Union Publishing Company and started manufacturing perfumes to give away with his books. McConnell discovered that his customers were more interested in the fragrances than the books, so he decided to concentrate on selling perfumes. The business was renamed the California Perfume Company (CPC) in an effort to associate its products with the perceived beauty of the Golden State.

From the beginning, CPC sold directly to the consumer through a national network of sales representatives, primarily women, who were looking for economic opportunity and flexible part-time employment. In 1929, CPC introduced the Avon brand in an effort to modernize its image. The corporation was renamed Avon Products, Inc. in 1950. Avon rapidly expanded into the international market during the 1950s and 1960s, principally Latin America and Europe. By the early 1970s, Avon International operated in sixteen countries.

Speakers at the event will come from around the USA and Europe and discuss Avon’s activities in the United States, Brazil, and Italy, as well as its efforts to reach out to African American women and diversity its American salesforce. The event’s keynote will be offered by Katino Manko, who helped bring the Avon Collection to Hagley. Manko’s book, Ding Dong! Avon Calling!: The Women and Men of Avon Products, Incorporated will be published in June.

The conference will be presented online. Each author has shared a paper relating to their presentation that those registered for the conference may view. Advance registration is required to view the pre-circulated papers and to participate in the conference sessions; there is no fee to register. The presenters retain full copyright of their papers and presentations. These materials may not be cited or quoted, or circulated for course use or any other purpose, without the express written permission of the author.  The conference is organized by Hagley’s Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society.

Friday May 7, 9 am – 12 noon EST via Zoom

Presenters

Jessica Burch, “Soap and Hope”: Direct Sales and the Culture of Work and Capitalism in Postwar America

Jessica Chelekis, Avon in the Brazilian Amazon: Direct Sales and Consumption among Vulnerable Communities

Lindsey Feitz, Creating a Multicultural Soul: Avon, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Race in the 1970s

Shawn Moura, Exploring Avon's Encounter with Gender, Race, and Class in Brazil, 1958-1975

Emanuela Scarpellini, Transnational Beauty: Avon International and the Case of Italy

 

Please join me in congratulating the winners of the Mira Wilkins Prize;

  • Paolo di Martino, Mark Latham & Michelangelo Vasta, ‘Bankruptcy Laws around Europe (1850-2015): Institutional Change and Institutional Features’, Enterprise & Society 21: 4 (December 2020), 936-990.
The committee, formed by Asli M. Colpan (Kyoto University, Japan), Rory M. Miller (University of Liverpool, UK), and Manuel Llorca-Jaña (Universidad de Valparaíso, Chile) "decided to award the prize to this paper for a number of reasons. The foundation for it is a large database of bankruptcy and insolvency laws which the authors have constructed, covering thirty European countries over 165 years; the data is fully detailed in the appendices to the paper. On this basis the authors have produced a properly comparative paper demonstrating how the legal provisions surrounding insolvency changed markedly over the period, yet differed significantly among countries, for example on who had the right to initiate proceedings, and the extent to which the law encouraged attempts to safeguard the business as a going concern. Legal provisions regarding insolvency were fundamental to the institutional environment within which business operated, yet the subject has largely been neglected. This paper is ambitious, and sheds considerable light on law and practice in Europe over a long period. It will thus be of interest not only to European business historians, but also to legal historians and those examining the construction of European nation-states during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries."
The committee also gave an honorable mention to:
  • Emily Buchnea, ‘Bridges and Bonds: The Role of British Merchant Bank Intermediaries in latin American Trade and Finance Networks, 1825-1850’, Enterprise & Society, 21: 2 (2020), 453-493.
  • Jessica Ann Levy, ‘Black Power in the Boardroom: Corporate America, the Sullivan Principles, and Anti-Apartheid’, Enterprise & Society 21: 1 (2020), 170-209.
To learn more about the Mira Wilkins Prize please click here.

Please join me in congratulating the winner of the Herman E. Krooss Prize for Best Dissertation in Business History;

  • Dylan Gottlieb (Princeton University), for his 2020 dissertation, “Yuppies: Young Urban Professionals and the Making of Postindustrial New York.”

This year, the committee was chaired by Heidi Tworek (University of British Columbia), and also included Pierre-Yves Donzé (Osaka University) and Gerardo Con Díaz (University of California, Davis). 

The committee decided "unanimously to award the 2021 Herman E. Krooss Prize to Dylan Gottlieb for his work entitled “Yuppies: Young Urban Professionals and the Making of Postindustrial New York.” Gottlieb’s dissertation explores how the influx of financial workers changed New York City from the 1970s to the 1990s. That demographic came to be known colloquially as “yuppies” or “young professionals.” The dissertation takes the category of “yuppies” seriously to understand “how young professionals remade the city, and how it in turn remade them,” as Gottlieb puts it. Each thematic chapter of the dissertation examines a seemingly familiar phenomenon like the Zagat restaurant guide or the marathon, uncovering how particular notions of yuppies’ behavior and habits shaped urban life, while also disadvantaging others such as low-income workers driven out of their homes to make space for yuppie residences in Hoboken, New Jersey. Gottlieb demonstrates brilliantly how business history can combine a cohort study with urban history, oral history, labor history, and cultural history. Finally, the dissertation was compellingly written, filled with a fine eye for fascinating detail. Once you read Gottlieb’s analysis of the rise of Zagat restaurant guides, you will never forget that their size was designed to fit into a yuppie’s suit pocket. We congratulate Dylan Gottlieb on writing an important new work in the field of business history."

For more information on the Herman E. Krooss Prize for Best Dissertation in Business History click here.

Please join me in congratulating the winners and finalists of the Hagley Prize;

Hagley Prize

The prize is awarded jointly by the Hagley Museum and Library and the Business History Conference to the best book in business history (broadly defined).

2021 Recipients

·         Marcia Chatelain, Franchise: The Golden Arches in Black America (WW Norton: 2019).

·         Ben Marsh, Unravelled Dreams: Silk and the Atlantic World, 1500–1840 (Cambridge: 2020).

2021 Finalists (in alphabetical order)

·         Marcia Chatelain, Franchise: The Golden Arches in Black America (WW Norton: 2019).

·         Jennifer Delton, The Industrialists: How the National Association of Manufacturers Shaped American Capitalism (Princeton: 2020).

·         Jan de Vries, The Price of Bread: Regulating the Market in the Dutch Republic (Cambridge: 2019).

·         Zachary Dorner, Merchants of Medicine: The Commerce and Coercion of Health in Britain’s Long Eighteenth Century (Chicago: 2020).

·         Paige Glotzer, How the Suburbs were Segregated: Developers and the Business of Exclusionary Housing, 1890–1960 (Columbia: 2020).

·         Joshua R. Greenberg, Bank Notes and Shinplasters: The Rage for Paper Money in the Early Republic (University of Pennsylvania: 2020). 

·         Suzanne L. Marchand, Porcelain: A History from the Heart of Europe (Princeton: 2020).

·         Ben Marsh, Unravelled Dreams: Silk and the Atlantic World, 1500–1840 (Cambridge: 2020).

·         Brandon K. Winford John Hervey Wheeler, Black Banking, and the Economic Struggle for Civil Rights (Kentucky: 2019).

·         Wendy A. Woloson, Crap: A History of Cheap Stuff in America (Chicago: 2020).

Visit our website to learn more about this prize and previous winners.