The Exchange: The BHC Weblog


The UCLA Center for 17th- & 18th-Century Studies will hold a conference on May 5-6, 2017, on "Coins of the Realm: Money, Value, and Sovereignty in the Early Modern Atlantic." According to the organizer, Andrew Apter of UCLA,

The conference addresses key relationships between money-forms and political authority during major transitions in the British Atlantic economy associated with the Stuart Restoration, the financial revolution, the Board of Trade and Plantations, and the Royal African Company. Of central importance is the Great Recoinage of 1696, which attempted to restore England’s national currency by realigning the nominal values of coins with their material worth as gold and silver. . . . Papers will draw on cases from England, the West Indies, colonial North America, and West Africa to highlight emergent connections between monetary value and political sovereignty in the early modern Atlantic.

The program and registration information are available on the conference website.

As part of ongoing efforts to add content to the BHC website, we are in the process of adding to the files of annual meeting programs. We are missing some early years, and so we send out this request for information. Years needed are

1954 (Northwestern University)
1954 (University of Michigan)
[1955] no meeting
1956 (Indiana University)
1957 [no meeting]
1958 (State Historical Society, Wisconsin)
1959 (University of Illinois)
1960 (Marquette University)
1961 (Purdue University)
1963 (Northwestern University)
1964 (Indiana University)
1965 (Kent State University)
1970 (University of Iowa)
1971 (Oberlin College)
1972 (Loyola University)
1974 (Hagley Museum and Library)
1975 (Northwestern University)

We would be grateful if readers who have copies of any of these programs would get in touch with Pat Denault (pat.denault@gmail.com). We'll let folks know when the current batch of older programs is uploaded. In the meantime, all programs, 2017-2003, are linked from our website at http://www.thebhc.org/all-annual-meetings.

As part of its 2017 annual meeting, the European Association for Banking and Financial History (EABH), in cooperation with BNP Paribas and Banque Lombard Odier, will hold a conference on June 23, 2017, entitled "Legacy of Finance: The Haute-Banque in the World from the 19th to the 21st Century." According to the organizers:

The haute banque emerged as a private banking elite in France during the Restoration period. Haute banque institutions were well respected and dealt with major international business and state affairs. They declined and vanished after the World Wars of the 20th century. Now, the haute banque is having a comeback in the 21st century. How did this happen? and why?

The full program is available on the EABH website, as is a listing of all the organization's events. Registration is open at https://2017eabh.eventbrite.co.uk. Early bird tickets for non-members are available until April 15.
     The full meeting will commence on June 22 with sessions for EABH members only. The keynote speaker for the EABH members' dinner will be Harold James, who will talk about "The Haute Banque and National Security."

At last week's annual meeting in Denver, Colorado, the Business History Conference awarded its two book prizes.

The Hagley Prize for the best book in business history in the previous year was awarded to Mark R. Wilson of the University of North Carolina, Charlotte, for Destructive Creation: American Business and the Winning of World War II (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016).

The Gomory Prize, made possible by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, recognizes historical work on the effects of business enterprises on the economic conditions of the countries in which they operate. In a first, Mark R. Wilson was the co-recipient of this prize as well. The co-winner was Johan Mathew of Rutgers University, for Margins of the Market: Trafficking and Capitalism across the Arabian Sea (University of California Press, 2016).

The Gomory committee also awarded an honorable mention, to William N. Goetzmann, for Money Changes Everything: How Finance Made Civilization Possible (Princeton University Press, 2016).

Hogarth, "Emblematical print of the South Sea," from <em>Hogarth Restored: The Whole Works of the celebrated William Hogarth, re-engraved by Thomas Cook (1812)</em>

The "Money, Power and Print" group will hold its eighth biennial colloquium in Siegen, Germany, on June 7-9, 2018. The group began as an association of scholars interested in interdisciplinary studies of contemporary attitudes toward the "financial revolution" in early-modern Britain, specifically the rise of banks, paper money, joint-stock corporations, stock markets, and public debt. Over time, its focus has gradually evolved and the interest now is on how those practices developed across early modern Europe.
According to the organizers of the colloquium:

Papers will be distributed in advance and presented in two-hour sessions at which all colloquium participants are present. Presenters will have five minutes to summarize their paper. The remainder of each session will be given over to questions and discussion, in which the goal is to enrich our mutual understanding by eliciting insights from all of the disciplines represented at the table. Authors are therefore expected to write for a non-specialist audience, avoiding jargon, making concepts from their own discipline readily accessible to all those present, seeking to identify areas of general interest, and focusing on questions on which scholars of various disciplines will have something to contribute. Graduate students and emerging scholars are particularly encouraged to submit proposals.

Initial expressions of interest of 250 words or fewer are due no later than April 15, 2017. For more details, please consult the full call for papers.

In the run-up to this week's BHC meeting, new March and April books, plus a few we missed:

Hannah Barker, Family and Business during the Industrial Revolution (Oxford University Press, March 2017)

Hartmut Berghoff and Adam Rome, eds., Green Capitalism: Business and the Environment in the Twentieth Century (University of Pennsylvania Press, April 2017)

Daina Ramey Berry, The Price for Their Pound of Flesh: The Value of the Enslaved from Womb to Grave in the Building of a Nation (Beacon Press, January 2017)

Fahad Ahmad Bishara, A Sea of Debt: Law and Economic Life in the Western Indian Ocean, 1780–1950 (Cambridge University Press, March 2017)

Paul Cheney, Cul de Sac: Patrimony, Capitalism, and Slavery in French Saint-Domingue (University of Chicago Press, February 2017)

Patrick Fridenson and Kikkawa Takeo, eds., Ethical Capitalism: Shibusawa Eiichi and Business Leadership in Global Perspective (University of Toronto Press, March 2017)

Peter James Hudson, Bankers and Empire: How Wall Street Colonized the Caribbean (University of Chicago Press, April 2017)

Harold A. Innis, Essays in Canadian Economic History, ed. Mary Q. Innis (University of Toronto Press, March 2017)

Sharon McConnell-Sidorick, Silk Stockings and Socialism: Philadelphia's Radical Hosiery Workers from the Jazz Age to the New Deal (University of North Carolina Press, April 2017)

Sharon Ann Murphy, Other People's Money: How Banking Worked in the Early American Republic
(Johns Hopkins University Press, February 2017)

Kim Phillips-Fein, Fear City: New York's Fiscal Crisis and the Rise of Austerity Politics (Macmillan, April 2017)

Steven Press, Rogue Empires: Contracts and Conmen in Europe’s Scramble for Africa (Harvard University Press, April 2017)

Benjamin C. Waterhouse, The Land of Enterprise: A Business History of the United States (Simon & Schuster, April 2017)

The Maintainers is a global, interdisciplinary research network whose members share an interest in the concepts of maintenance, infrastructure, repair, and the myriad forms of labor and expertise that sustain the human-built world. The group is holding its second conference, “The Maintainers II: Labor, Technology, and Social Orders,” to be hosted at Stevens Institute of Technology on April 6-9, 2017. The program is now available.
    The group also runs an occasional blog and has a mailing list to which those interested can subscribe; they also have a Twitter account. Questions may be addressed to Lee Vinsel at lee.vinsel@gmail.com.

The Business History Conference (BHC) is holding its 2017 meeting in Denver, Colorado, on March 30-April 1. The final version of the program is now available on the BHC website, including links to abstracts and a few full papers. Special sessions include an opening plenary on Thursday evening, on "The Cultures of a Business Civilization"; another on Friday afternoon, "Keywords in American Economic and Business History"; and the Krooss Dissertation plenary, on Saturday evening.
    In addition, the BHC hosts a number of pre-meeting activities, including two workshops, a paper development workshop sponsored by the Copenhagen Business School, and the Doctoral Colloquium.
    Advance on-line registration has closed, but attendees may register for the meeting itself in person.

The Business History Conference will hold its 2018 meeting on April 5-7 in Baltimore, Maryland. The theme of the meeting will be "Money, Finance, and Capital." The program committee--comprising David Sicilia (chair), Christy Ford Chapin, Per Hansen, Naomi Lamoreaux, Rory Miller, Julia Ott, and Mary O’Sullivan (BHC president)--explains:

Historians who want to write compelling histories of capitalism must grapple with the manifold roles that money, finance, and capital have played in political, economic, social and cultural dynamics. Yet, for many years, the abstruse and elusive character of these phenomena encouraged many historians of economic life to maintain a safe distance from them. Of course, there have always been some historians willing to figure out where money, finance, and capital fit into broader histories of our societies. Still, much of what we know about currency and credit, investment and profit, bonds and futures results from highly specialized research whose technical quality reinforces the enigmatic character of these subjects. . . . The theme of the 2018 BHC conference is designed to encourage contributions from a variety of approaches to historical research on the themes of money, finance, and capital, covering a broad range of periods and geographies.

    While proposals on the theme are encouraged, papers addressing all other topics will receive equal consideration by the program committee in accordance with BHC policy. The program committee will consider both individual papers and entire panels. Individual paper proposals should include a one-page (300 word) abstract and one-page curriculum vitae (CV). Panel proposals should include a cover letter stating the rationale for the panel and the name of its contact person; one-page (300 word) abstract and author’s CV for each paper; and a list of preferred panel chairs and commentators with contact information. To submit a proposal go to http://thebhc.org/2018-bhc-meeting and click on the link Submit a Paper/Panel Proposal.
     The 2018 call for papers also includes information about applying for the K. Austin Kerr Prize and the Herman E. Krooss Prize. The deadline for all proposals is October 2, 2017.
    The BHC Doctoral Colloquium in Business History will be held in conjunction with the BHC annual meeting. Funded by Cambridge University Press, the 2018 colloquium will take place in Baltimore on Wednesday, April 4 and Thursday, April 5. Typically limited to ten students, the colloquium is open to early stage doctoral candidates pursuing dissertation research within the broad field of business history, from any relevant discipline. Applications, due by November 15, 2017 via email to BHC@Hagley.org, should include: a statement of interest; CV; preliminary or final dissertation prospectus (10-15 pages); and a letter of support from the dissertation supervisor (or prospective supervisor). Questions about the colloquium should be sent to its director, Edward Balleisen, eballeis@duke.edu. All participants receive a stipend that partially defrays travel costs to the annual meeting. 
    For a fuller discussion of the meeting theme, suitable topics, and prize and colloquium guidelines, please see the full call for papers. General questions regarding the BHC’s 2018 annual meeting may be sent to Secretary-Treasurer Roger Horowitz, rh@udel.edu.

Business History has issued a call for papers for a special volume on "Indian Business in the Global World." According to guest editors Swapnesh Masrani, School of Management, University of Stirling, and Carlo Morelli, School of Social Sciences, University of Dundee:

Indian business history remains a largely unexplored area of research for a European and North American academic audience. Hitherto Indian business history has largely been addressed within a dichotomy of its relationship to the rise of the domestic economic industrialization or alternatively within a context of subordination to, and exploitation by, western multinationals. Thus the relationship between indigenous development and Indian firms’ integration and growth within a wider world economy has been paid little attention. This call . . . seeks to place the development of Indian business in its wider relationships to both the Indian domestic economy and the world economy.

For a fuller discussion of the aims of this special issue, please see the full call for papers.
     Articles should be based on original research and/or innovative analysis and should not be under consideration by another journal. All articles should be submitted by March 31, 2017. Submission instructions are available on the journal website. Questions may be directed to Swapnesh Masrani or Carlo Morelli.